"Pedal People" section from rough cut of "Death and Taxes" film

This is a section of the rough cut of a film I worked on from 2007 to 2009, called "Death and Taxes: Refusing To Pay For War."

This segment of the film focused on a war tax resister who runs a unique bicycle-powered business that was set up to make it easier for its employees to be war tax resisters.

My original vision for the film was for it to be an entertaining and compelling story that also clearly taught the viewer the basics of war tax resistance. (see this blog entry from an early editing stage in the project: steev.hise.org/content/trying-tell-story-war-tax-resistance ) Budgetary and other problems resulted in me being unable to finish the film, but a new editor, Carlos Steward, stepped in to complete it, though the result was quite different than what I'd planned.

For more information about the finished film, see nwtrcc.org/deathandtaxes.php

Cast: steev hise

Original roughcut Julia Butterfly segment for "Death and Taxes"

This is one section of the rough cut of a film I worked on from 2007 to 2009, called "Death and Taxes: Refusing To Pay For War."

My original vision for the film was for it to be an entertaining and compelling story that also clearly taught the viewer the basics of war tax resistance. (see this blog entry from an early editing stage in the project: steev.hise.org/content/trying-tell-story-war-tax-resistance ) Budgetary and other problems resulted in me being unable to finish the film. This section is about Julia Butterfly Hill, the famous activist who withheld the most war taxes in history. The film was eventually completed by another editor.

For information about the finished film, see nwtrcc.org/deathandtaxes.php

Cast: steev hise

Tags: tax, taxes, war, peace, activism, film, filmmaking, julia butterfly hill, death and money

Original "Death and Taxes" Intro

This is the introductory section of the rough cut of a film I worked on from 2007 to 2009, called "Death and Taxes: Refusing To Pay For War."

My original vision for the film was for it to be an entertaining and compelling story that also clearly taught the viewer the basics of war tax resistance. (see this blog entry from an early editing stage in the project: steev.hise.org/content/trying-tell-story-war-tax-resistance ) Budgetary and other problems resulted in me being unable to finish the film, but a new editor, Carlos Steward, stepped in to complete it, though the result was very different and more basic, formally, than what I'd planned to achieve.

With this intro fragment I hope to convey something of the idea I was originally going for - something grounded in personal narrative that would engage people on a different level than a traditional talking-heads type doc.

For information about the finished film, see nwtrcc.org/deathandtaxes.php

Cast: steev hise

Tags: tax, death, war, military, peace, filmmaking, narrative and story

Fav Quotes from "They Take Our Jobs!"

In the middle of the news-cycle theater piece known as "the possible shutdown," and "budget-cutting," it's good to see some of the border militarization fantasies get checked by monetary obsessions, and the thinkers of rational big business are advocating  even more such restraint. (this is really nothing new - smart people at the WSJ have known the stupidities of "closing/securing the border" for quite some time.) Read more>>>

Interesting Times

An ancient Chinese curse goes as follows: "May you live in interesting times."  In this way we definitely live in interesting times lately.

What do people do in interesting times? In this time of instant communication from all parts of the globe, the interesting and the unfortunate are all available for view by Read more>>>

Problem-solving

I learned very early in life that the best way to begin figuring something out, fixing something or answering some question or solving something or just getting anything accomplished at all is to first DEFINE what the problem, question, or goal is.  I've never forgotten that but many apparently never learned this in the first place.

Of course another key to life is communication. Always strive to be the very best you can be at communicating whatever it is to the other person or persons.  Your level of communication will deterimine your level of sucess at whatever it is you're trying to do that involves other people besides yourself.

Put these 2 basic rules of thumb together and of course that means, when you're trying to get something done, or some problem fixed, or some trouble troubleshot, and you're asking someone else to help you with that, you have to accurately and clearly communicate to them what that problem IS, or if you don't know that yourelf, at least communicate with them clearly enough all the bits and piece so that you and they can help you figure out what the fundamental goal is.  Until that other person or persons has a good idea of what your goal is, what problem you're trying to solve, they literally can't help you. They can maybe randomly get you closer to what you're going for, but  this will be accidental, and probably frustrating for both parties even after eventual success.

The reason this is important is this: let's say you are asking someone to help you with something but you already have an idea of how to do it, you just need need them to help you execute it. you ask them because they know that area of expertise, they have experience doing this sort of thing, possibly more than you.  But what if you're wrong about what it will take to solve the problem? So you ask them to solve it in your wrong way and they either try to do your wrong way, not realizing what you're up to, or they just get confused and they start asking questions in a wild goose chase attempt to figure out why you asked for such a a thing. If you're just started out describing what your problem was, instead of asking them to help you with your incorrect solution, then the other person would have been free to apply their expertise to help you come up with the right answer, quickly and without fuss and frustration.  The other thing is that this gives the other person some sense that you respect his expertise and trust him to help you generate a solution, rather than that you look at him as just some unthinking pack animal that you expect some aditional brute force from.

Read more>>>

No More Deaths Training Video

Background and introductory information on border history, current situation, and civil initiative, for the instruction of new No More Deaths volunteers.

Cast: steev hise

Tags: border, immigration, no more deaths, desert, history and organizing

Supervising Glitches

Created for the Vimeo Weekend Project in which we were to remix a film from the 40s from the Prelinger Archives (archive.org/details/prelinger) called Supervising Women in the Workplace (archive.org/details/Supervis1944).

For this remix I did some simple selecting and colorization of some excerpts and then ran them through some software written in Ruby that uses a library called aviglitch.
more details on aviglitch are here:
ucnv.github.com/aviglitch/

Cast: steev hise

Tags: sexism, feminism, men, women, gender, glitch, remix and appropriation

What It Means When They Talk About Loving Your Country

There were 2 things about Obama's speech here in Tucson the other night that I wanted to discuss. Before I start I should say that for the most part I was impressed and satisfied with his performance. Indeed it was one of the best speeches he's ever delivered, I think, and it was, realistically, about the best thing anyone could have wanted.
But one thing really struck me the moment he said it, and another thing he said got me thinking about it a day later. The first was also wisely noticed and commented on yesterday by Michael Chabon in The Atlantic:

 

as he moved from an invocation of the innocence and immanence of the dead little girl to a call, part admission, part admonishment, part fatherly exhortation, for Americans "to make sure this country lives up to our children's expectations," the speech found its true importance, its profundity. To attempt to live up to your children's expectations—to hew to the ideals you espouse and the morals that you lay down for them—is to guarantee a life of constant failure....

When I heard Obama give that part of the speech I was almost outraged Read more>>>

Hard But Not Dry

bottling cider batch 2cider experiment tonite: I wanted to solve the problem of how to get hard cider that's not too dry - it's too dry because the yeast eats up pretty much all the sugar and turns it to alcohol, right? My theory is, what if I stop the fermentation early by heating the stuff, hot enough to kill the yeast, but not hot enough to boil off the ethanol (boiling point 178 degrees F). So I tried it. I kept aside about a cup of yeasty cider. heated the rest to about 135 for 30 minutes. let it cool down, then before bottling i mixed it back in with the cup of yeasty stuff so that when i bottled, there'd still be a little fermenting to provide carbonation. but hopefully not *too* much, resulting in exploding bottles... i'll let you know what happens... Read more>>>

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