Archive

Motherless Brooklyn

Motherless Brooklyn

author: Jonathan Lethem

name: Steev

average rating: 3.91

book published: 1999

rating: 5

read at:

date added: 2019/03/10

shelves: crime, novels, own-it

review:
This is great. Lethem is so consistently great and I don't know why I never read this sooner.
I love that the narrator has Tourette's. Is there any precedent for that? It's a great, at least to me, realistic take on OCD, from the inside.

The Subject Steve

The Subject Steve

author: Sam Lipsyte

name: Steev

average rating: 3.00

book published: 2001

rating: 4

read at:

date added: 2019/02/15

shelves: fun, novels, own-it

review:
This is a great book. Laugh-out-loud funny, dark, profound. Poetic and snarky and satiric and brilliant. Certainly Lipsyte got better after this first novel. Homeland and The Ask are better. But if you're a fan and a completist, definitely read this.

The drawbacks are that Lipsyte is one of those authors that is all about style rather than realism. His books are bit like Aaron Sorkin's scripts. Nobody really talks that way, but, but it's so good that you don't care. Except you wouldn't want to read only this kind of thing. It's like poetry, rather than a story you can believe in. And that's fine.

The Baffler Number 42

The Baffler Number 42

author: Chris Lehman

name: Steev

average rating: 0.0

book published:

rating: 5

read at:

date added: 2019/01/30

shelves: own-it, politics, fun

review:

A Feast of Snakes

A Feast of Snakes

author: Harry Crews

name: Steev

average rating: 4.02

book published: 1976

rating: 4

read at: 2019/01/29

date added: 2019/01/29

shelves: fun, novels, own-it

review:
I like this but it was pretty brutal. Kind of like a 70s version of Cormac McCarthy. Lots of senseless pointless violence, graphic sex, racism, misogyny. But there is a deeper thread somewhere. Southern redneck ex football player jock has an existential crisis in the midst of A bachanalian redneck mega party.

Strong Female Protagonist: Book Two (Strong Female Protagonist, #5 and 6)

Strong Female Protagonist: Book Two (Strong Female Protagonist, #5 and 6)

author: Brennan Lee Mulligan

name: Steev

average rating: 4.16

book published: 2017

rating: 5

read at:

date added: 2019/01/01

shelves:

review:

The Baffler No. 41: Mind Cures

The Baffler No. 41: Mind Cures

author: Lehmann, Chris

name: Steev

average rating: 4.00

book published:

rating: 5

read at: 2018/12/31

date added: 2018/12/31

shelves: fun, own-it, politics, spirit-self

review:

Truth or Dare: Art and Documentary

Truth or Dare: Art and Documentary

author: Gail Pearce

name: Steev

average rating: 4.00

book published: 2006

rating: 4

read at: 2018/12/17

date added: 2018/12/17

shelves: filmmaking, art, politics, own-it

review:

The Fun Parts: Stories

The Fun Parts: Stories

author: Sam Lipsyte

name: Steev

average rating: 3.50

book published: 2014

rating: 5

read at: 2018/12/04

date added: 2018/12/04

shelves: own-it, short-fiction, fun

review:
Lipsyte's writing is a bit like a cross between Raymond Carver and Mark Leyner. It's got the darkness, the working-class losers and fuck-ups, and it's got the wacky, the zany, the extreme ADHD-style phrasing. It's hilarious and depressing at the same time. Like life.

Post-Truth

Post-Truth

author: Lee McIntyre

name: Steev

average rating: 4.17

book published:

rating: 5

read at:

date added: 2018/11/30

shelves: own-it, politics

review:

The Average American Male

The Average American Male

author: Chad Kultgen

name: Steev

average rating: 3.45

book published: 2007

rating: 4

read at: 2018/11/25

date added: 2018/11/25

shelves: fun, own-it, novels

review:
In tone this reminds me a lot of American Psycho, only without the ultraviolence. In its dispassionate, dry delivery of the events of the story, it also is reminiscent, to my mind, of Shoplifting from American Apparel. In a way, it's even more poisonous than American Psycho, because the book is even less obvious that it's making a point and that it's a sort of satire, and that as has become increasingly clear, there will always be some audience members of a satire dumb enough to think it's earnest, no matter how obvious the satire appears.

Hence I have mixed feelings about this. How many young men have already read this novel, earnestly, and absorbed its toxic messaging as reinforcing how they think of and treat women?